What are Alaska Car Seat Laws?

 

Welcome to the Alaska Car Seat Law Explained in Simple, Plain English!

Alaska-Car-Seat-Laws

You just found the right place if you want to know what the car seat laws in Alaska are, and best of all, no legal jargon is used.

Look:

I have three growing kids, and I used to be a paralegal, and I know how daunting it is to search and understand dry legal stuff. This is why I’ve decided to break down the law in simple terms that even the most sleep-deprived parent understands.

No matter what you’re looking for, let it be booster seat law, rear or forward-facing or taxi car seat laws, I have the answer for it. Dig in and find out what’s the best way to keep your kids safe.

Let’s get started already!

 

By reading this article you agree that it’s for informational purposes and I can’t be held liable for the best advice ask the appropriate person.

 

Alaska Booster Seat Laws

Alaska-Booster-Seat-Laws

The booster seat law in Alaska is quite straightforward

If your child is in the 4-8 age bracket weighing less than 65 pounds or they are under 57”, they have to be secured in a booster car seat.

The only exception is if your child is taller than 57”, then the driver can decide if they use the booster seat or choose the seat belt instead.

 

Alaska Rear-facing Car Seat Laws

Rear-facing in Alaska is limited to the age of one and 20 pounds. If your child is less than 1 year old or weighs less than 20 pounds, you will have to secure them with a rear-facing car seat.

As soon as they are older and weigh more than 20 pounds, you can upgrade to the next stage.

However, countless experts say that for the best protection, it’s better to keep your child rear-facing until the age of 2, simply because it’s the safest way to ride.

 

Alaska Forward-facing Car Seat Laws

In Alaska, you can put your child in forward-facing mode when they are older than 1 and weigh more than 20 pounds. In my personal experience, it’s better to keep your little one rear-facing until the age of 2 or longer.

So between 1 and 5, your child can use a forward-facing car seat depending on how they grow.

 

Alaska Taxi Car Seat Laws

In Alaska there are no exemptions for taxis. So make sure you have the proper car seat or arrange it ahead of time if it’s possible.

Besides taxis, rider sharing services have to follow these rules as well.

 

When Can My Child Sit in the Front Seat in Alaska?

The law doesn’t specify and age when you can move your child to the front seat. Some people argue that they should only move to the front if they can safely use the seat belt. While others say that you can put your child at any age in the front while you disable the airbags.

 

Alaska Car Seat Laws at a Glance

Car Seat Law (Sec. 2. AS 28.05.095)

Law: All kids under the age of 16 have to follow these rules:

  • If you have kids under the age of 1 or weigh less than 20 pounds, you have to secure them in a rear-facing car seat. In other words, you can move to the next stage only if they weigh more than 20 pounds.
  • If your child is between 1 and 5 years old, you need to use a federally approved child safety seat. It doesn’t require a rear-facing mode. However, it’s recommended.
  • Suppose your child is between 4 and 8 years old and weighs between 20 and 65 pounds, and their height doesn’t exceed 57 inches, then you will have to use a booster seat.
  • The exception from this rule would be if your child is taller than 57”, then the driver can decide if using.
  • In case your child is between 8 and 16 years old, and they don’t exceed the height and weight limits set by booster seats, then the driver can decide if they continue using the booster seat or they go with the seat belt instead.
  • Location in car: No law says where a child can sit. However, if you plan to move your child in the front, make sure that the front airbags are disabled.

Taxi: Taxis in Alaska are not exempt from the car seat rules. You will either have to bring your own or arrange it ahead of time with the cab company. This applies to ride-sharing services as well.

RideSafer legal: Yes. The Ride Safer travel vest qualifies for children at least age 3 and 30 pounds.

Fines: $50

Seat Belt Laws

Law: There are no exceptions. All passengers have to use the seat belt while traveling.

Fine: $15

RVs: With RVs, the rule is that all passengers need to use the seat belt or the proper restraint for kids.

 

What is the law concerning Leaving kids in the Car in Alaska

There are no laws governing leaving a child in the car unattended, however, I highly recommend not doing it.

 

Is it Illegal to Smoke in a Car with a Child in Alaska?

Yes, there’s a law that forbids smoking while transporting children, according to the Alaska Admin. Code 10.1085 all rides where kids are present should be smoke-free.

 

Conclusions on Alaska Car Seat Laws

We have reached the end of this article.

I hope by now you’ve found what you’ve been looking for. I’ve done my best to keep things simple and explain them as easily as possible.

Also, if you have questions or I’ve missed something, let me know, and I will update this post. Keep your precious ones safe.

Maybe you can help me out by sharing this post so other parents can know exactly how to keep their kids safe and avoid fines in the process. Thank You!

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions:

What are the car seat laws in Alaska?

The Alaska car seat laws dictate the following. Kids under the age of one and 20 pounds should be in a rear-facing car seat. Kids between the ages of 1 and 5 should be in forward-facing mode. Kids between the ages of 4 and 8 should be in a booster seat if they are less than 57”.

How old does a child have to be to sit in the front seat in Alaska?

There’s no law governing the front seat use for kids in Alaska. If you have a smaller child, make sure that the airbag is disabled. Experts say that kids age 13 can sit in the front.

When can a child go without a car seat or booster?

In Alaska, a child can go without a booster seat if they are older than 8 or they are taller than 57”

At what weight can a child sit without a car seat?

According to Alaska’s car seat laws, a child can go without a car seat if they weigh more than 65 pounds and they are over 57”.

 

Last Updated on May 18, 2022 by Danny Reid